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Flux Pavilion Interview @ Exchange LA

 

Last Thursday was one for the books for Insomniac’s Bassrush Thursdays at Exchange LA.
Exchange pulls a lot of big name artist with the most recent being Flux Pavilion.   Thursday’s crowd was hyped from the beginning of this electrifying night all the way to brilliant finale.  Flux’s fan base brought an upbeat vibe that is both energetic and rare in today’s music scene. The venue did everything right to ensure that this urban culture stayed positive and amped all night long.

I had the pleasure of interviewing Josh, aka Flux Pavilion, at the beginning of the night as he arrived to make his debut at Exchange LA.  Along with the basic questions that occur in most interviews, I was privileged to be one of the first to hear of upcoming plans for the future of Flux Pavilion.

Me:

Most everyone sees you as a Dubstep artist, but personally I have heard much more from you then just Dubstep. What is it about electronic music as a whole that you fell in love with and wanted to start producing?

 

Flux Pavilion:

“I think it was the idea that with electronic music you can make a sound that no one has ever heard before, like you literally can, you can make a sound that no human being has ever heard before which is really interesting.”

 

Me:

You started making music after you attended University right?

 

Flux Pavilion:

“No before University, I was about 13 when I started.”

 

Me:

I understand you are influenced by the Chemical Brothers, the Beatles, Rusko and David Bowie.  Is there anyone else I am missing and why are you influenced by them?

 

 

Flux Pavilion:

“Frank Zappa is one of the guys I talk about quite a lot is an influence. You can’t really hear it musically in what I do but spiritually, I’ve always been quite a fan of the punk, like fuck you kind of music, like the you do what you want to do, and I’ll do what I want to do kind of thing.  To me it was like they didn’t give a fuck what was happening, they were just doing their thing and that is exactly what we’ve been about this whole time.

 

Me:

How do you come up with some of these tracks like I Can’t Stop, Gold Dust, and Bass Cannon?

 

Flux Pavilion:

“Basically when I write tracks I have a feeling in mind, so let’s say I hear a Pendulum track and I’m like this is fucking ace but I’m not as good as Rob, like I never, I don’t ever inspire to be as good as Rob because he is like in a next level producer situation where as I am more of a musician. I guess by composing the stuff, by being inspired by the work that he does, but I can’t do that because I don’t have the skill set to do that so I get inspired by how that track makes me feel.  So I utilize my skill set in that respect. Like with “I Can’t Stop” people always said that it’s a track that no one else has made a track like it and I always said no one else has got my skill set, not because I’m better, NOT that I am better then people it’s that I have a specific thing that I am good at and I try to capture the vibe and use the thing that I am good at.  I mean this is what makes all artists different.”

 

Me:

Is it true you actually played some kind of instrument (even an ash tray) in your tracks?

 

Flux Pavilion:

“Well I am always pissen about with different sounds, I think that when artist tries to sound like each other, which does happen quite a lot, is when you lose all the soul.  Whereas when an artist tries to feel or capture the soul of one another it’s really cool.  That’s what is really cool about Dubstep, is that for like me and Doctor P and Skream and Skrillex we all had different sounds, we weren’t trying to copy each other’s sounds, but we all evolved into this really cool like feeling, and then we all just tried to capture that feeling in our own way.”

 

Me:

Obviously Shaun, Doctor P and you are best friends right?

 

Flux Pavilion:

“Yeah! Yeah.”

 

Me:

How did you and Shaun come up with the idea of Circus Record and what did you guys originally want out of the label.

 

Flux Pavilion:

“It kind of started off with a means to an end, like, here’s a way that we can release music without having to listen to other people.  We don’t have to listen to anyone who goes “oh I don’t like that song” and instead we say, Oh cool you don’t have to like it but we are still putting it out, that’s what I liked about it.  But now it started to turn into a bit more of an independent label, we are signing loads of new artist who now want to have a voice in electronic music but they don’t want to be pushed through the mold, like Spinnin, which is an incredibly awesome label doing what they’re doing, but there is a very praticular voice you have to have to be connected to that label, it’s almost like when you listen to their music it’s almost a certain sound.  Like at Circus we kind of had that for a bit but then we decided that’s not what we want to be, we don’t want to be a type cast label, we want to be a label for collective minds who want to do their own shit.”

 

Me:

Ya! I was looking over your website today and you’re right, you guys do have a great mix of different artist on your label, like for example Dillon Francis is under your label.

 

Flux Pavilion:

“Exactly, it’s for people who want to do cool shit.”

 

Me:

I mean obviously you are one of my favorites even from High School, I still remember listening to your Blue Skies remix back in 2010.

 

Flux Pavilion:

“Oh ya, that wasn’t necessarily a fan favorite but I still play it now and it goes off.”

 

Me:

Only a couple more questions for you man, one of the coolest things I have come across is that you and Shaun, Doctor P, use to be in a band together?

 

Flux Pavilion:

“Ya we have been in a few bands together, that’s how it all kind of started really. I had gotten a guitar and I knew a bassist and we were all let’s start a band.  The only drummer in town, we grew up in a small town, Shaun was like the drummer, he was the only guy that really had a drum kit, so we hit him up and asked if he wanted to join our band and he started showing me like drum and bass and symphs and stuff like that and I was like “I’m going to start coming to your house for lunch”.”

 

Me:

Is it true that there is a possibility of you doing a live act in the near future?

 

Flux Pavilion:

“Ya, I’ve kinda been working on it for the past like two or three years.  We’re just trying to work out how to capture, you know the essence of what makes a DJ set good , but also includes the idea of improvisation I feel like is the thing.  I was talking to my friend about Jazz, like you know some people get real mad on Jazz, but like Jazz is the best, the real cool thing about it is improvisation is key on that night, whatever you’re feeling you can do it, you can play whatever you want.  Where as a DJ you can’t really do that, sure you can pick and play new tunes in different orders, but really you can’t do that much.  So we want to work out a way that we can blow people’s minds with the sounds we’re making but also be able to improvise it at the same time.  That way I can do a different show every time and I can play a different solo or we can replay the notes in a different way.

So we have been working on that, it’s more of that we are trying to work it out really well in that it comes out right and I think we just about nailed it about two months ago, we had a session and it went pretty good.”

 

Me:

That’s awesome! That leads to my next question, so when you aren’t doing a live act like tonight, how do you get the crowd going for your entire set.

 

Flux Pavilion:

“Well I play songs…”

 

Me:

HAHA obviously! But do you change it up while on stage or …?

 

Flux Pavilion:

“Well I kind of got it down I guess sort of.  You’ve got to look at it like waves I suppose, you’ve got the buildup then the drop and you have to be able to catch those waves so that the sound keeps going, it keeps going and you let the song build up and then you let it drop, you let the wave crash.  But then you start again because people will get tired and you’ve got to read that.  Almost like a surfer, like if you’ve never surfed and you are a first time surfer, you aren’t going to know what you are doing”

 

Me:

One last question, so for your remix for the Star Wars Rebel show, are you a Star Wars fan?

 

Flux Pavilion:

“Oh ya, oh ya”

 

Me:

So did you get asked to produce that song or did you just want to do it?

 

Flux Pavilion:

“Well they asked me to do it and I’m actually working on some SciFi stuff at the moment, something separate from Flux Pavilion.  I’ve been working on writing some like SciFi stories and stuff like that, So I’m sorta like that guy, I hate using the word like geek or nerd but I have been since I was a kid and I have become my own person, and I’m like shit, I can actually get involved in this stuff now, now I can actually do Cosplay if I want, shit like that is what I’m into.

I’ve been talking to artists and people who write comic books and graphic novels, writers and stuff like that about trying to do a really, sort of out there interconnected graphic novel and an electronic record and do the two together. Some people have done similar things like in hip hop, also Porter Robinson.  Destroid did a kind of similar thing.  There are a few people that fuse sort of a graphic novel world with their music.  But I want to flip it the other way and have someone write a comic and I’ll write music towards that. So yeah, maybe the next two or three years Ill have a show at Comic Con.”

 

I found Flux to be a most humble and down to earth kind of guy. He showed nothing but the most respect for his passions, for electronic music and most of all, towards his fans.

Flux played a 75 minute set which had Exchange LA bumping louder than it has possibly bumped before.  Flux did exactly what he said in the interview, he created such a fun, exciting environment for his fans and supporters that there was absolutely no dull moments in any part of his set.

Be on the lookout for a possible Flux Pavilion LIVE set in the near future, it will be an amazing opportunity to see an incredible artist show off an incredible set skills.

1 Comment on Flux Pavilion Interview @ Exchange LA

  1. Flux was awesome that night! Great interview! :)

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